Everything From A Single Para English Aptitude Test- The Mint 26/09/2019

The Mint

Everything From A Single Para English Aptitude Test- The Mint 26/09/2019

These Questions Completely based on Single “The Mint Editorial”. The purpose to start this is to make you read the same paragraph again and again to understand the different types of questions like comprehension, cloze test, sentence arrangement, sentence improvement, vocab, antonyms, synonyms, fillers (all based on single paragraph) etc. Reading this paragraph while practicing these questions will help you understand the meaning of the paragraph and also it will you a deep insight about how they framed the paragraph and how to attempt questions properly.

The Mint Editorial : 26 September 2019

Title: The cathedral thinking of Greta Thunberg

Subject: The 16-year-old has shaken the world up on climate change and called for a far-sighted plan that lays a foundation for action. We need not fall for doomsday prophecies to listen

An entire summit on climate change at the United Nations has been overshadowed by an electrifying speech delivered by a student activist, one that should escape nobody’s attention. All of 16, Greta Thunberg of Sweden admonished world leaders for their “betrayal” of the world’s young through their myopic inertia over a crisis that could jeopardize the lives of generations to come.
The conference itself was the usual catalogue of country-wise promises on scaling back carbon emissions to mitigate global warming, but it was the teenage Swede who snapped audiences awake across the globe. She pointed a finger squarely at governments and mega corporations, accusing them of putting money and “eternal economic growth” at the forefront of their agenda. The truth of this is debatable.
However, in a world where the leader of the world’s most powerful country, the US, portrays “globalists” as has-beens and “patriots” as the future, a voice of dissent as passionate as Thunberg’s revives the hope that global policy action could save the planet from the ravages of soaring mercury.
Much of what Thunberg says and does is rather radical. Her demands can sound unrealistic and not all her assertions bear scientific scrutiny. Her early fame came from her school strikes as a form of protest, but what ought to concentrate minds is her call for “cathedral thinking” in tackling climate change.
A concept that dates back to Europe’s medieval era, this refers to the creation of a visionary blueprint for action that assumes a shared commitment to a common cause far beyond the foreseeable future. “We must lay the foundation while we may not know exactly how to build the ceiling,” she is reported to have said earlier this year. That countries are squabbling over relatively minor issues, as she sees it, would explain her exasperation with our leaders.
But are policymakers failing Thunberg as badly as she seems to believe? Many analysts caution against the bandying about of doomsday scenarios. That our species is staring at extinction, as some activists suggest, is an exaggeration. Yes, a warmer planet will cause much devastation, mostly in poorer countries. Haphazard atmospheric patterns have begun to wreak havoc in many places. Apart from frequent droughts and floods, according to the latest report of the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the global average sea level is projected to rise by 1.1 metres by 2100, which could displace 700 million residents of low-lying regions.
To avert the perils, we have resolved under the Paris Accord to keep our average temperature from rising no further than 1.5° Celsius. For this, all countries need to slash their carbon emissions sharply by 2030, depending on the size of their economies. Progress so far has been tardy, largely because the process is costly. However, the world will not become uninhabitable if that target is missed.
Since the phenomenon affects people unevenly in different parts of the world, and we have almost 200 sovereign nations, the focus of global talks could shift from the moral imperative to quit spewing pollutants towards crafting a deal between those doing the most damage and those who’ll bear the brunt of it. This may need the sort of give and take that we see at trade negotiations. While Thunberg’s cathedral thinking calls for everybody’s consideration, globalists and patriots alike, at the end, it’s the details that must deliver.

Directions (1-3) Choose the similar meaning
Q1. Overshadowed
a) leeway
b) bland
c) zest less
d) command
e) morose

Q2. Myopic
a) insipid
b) rueful
c) uncreative
d) placid
e) doleful

Q3. Assertions
a) variance
b) limited
c) yield
d) flurry
e) drum fire

Directions: (4-5) choose the opposite meaning
Q4. Squabbling
a) confine
b) accord
c) aid
d) enmesh
e) involve

Q5. Exasperation
a) blitz
b) pander
c) embroil
d) entangle
e) charm

Direction (6-7): Which of the following phrases given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in bold letters to make the sentence meaningfully correct. Choose the best option among the five given alternatives that reflect the correct use of phrase in the context of the grammatically correct sentence.
Q6. Her early fame came from her school strikes as a form of protest, but what ought concentrate minds is her call for “cathedral thinking” in tackling climate change
a) what should
b) what would
c) what ought
d) what ought to
e) what may be

Q7. A voice of dissent as passionate as Thunberg’s revive the hope that global policy action could save the planet from the ravages of soaring mercury.
a) Thunberg’s revives
b) Thunberg’s revive
c) Thunberg’s revived
d) Thunberg revives
e) Thunberg revive

Directions (8-10): In the passage given below there are blanks which are numbered from 8 to 10. They are to be filled with the options given below the passage against each of the respective numbers. Find out the appropriate word in each case which can most suitably complete the sentence without altering its meaning.
She pointed a finger squarely at governments and ………..8……….. corporations, accusing them of putting money and “…………..9………. economic growth” at the forefront of their agenda. The truth of this is ………….10……….
Q8.
a) mega
b) namesake
c) benefit
d) forfeit
e) gloomy

Q9.
a) evacuee
b) place
c) found
d) eternal
e) tenant

Q10.
a) murky
b) debatable
c) denizen
d) pseudo
e) tacit

Directions (11-12): Read each of the following sentences to find out if there is any grammatical error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number (A, B, C or d) of this part is your answer. If there is no error in the statement, then mark option (e) as your answer choice.
Q11. A entire summit on climate(a)/ change at the United Nations(b)/ has been overshadowed by an(c)/ electrifying speech delivered by a student activist(d)/(e)/
a) a
b) b
c) c
d) d
e) e

Q12. The conference itself was the usual(a)/ catalogue of country-wise promises on(b)/ scaling back carbon emissions to mitigate global warming, but(c)/ it was the teenage Swede who snapped audiences awake across the globe(d)/(e)/
a) a
b) b
c) c
d) d
e) e

Directions (13-15): Rearrange the following sentences (a), (b), (c), (d), and (e) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions given below.
a) This may need the sort of give and take that we see at trade negotiations.
b) Progress so far has been tardy, largely because the process is costly.
c) Since the phenomenon affects people unevenly in different parts of the world, and we have almost 200 sovereign nations.
d) However, the world will not become uninhabitable if that target is missed.
e) The focus of global talks could shift from the moral imperative to quit spewing pollutants towards crafting a deal between those doing the most damage and those who’ll bear the brunt of it.
Q13. Which is the Second step after rearrangement?
a) a
b) b
c) c
d) d
e) e

Q14. Which is the Third step after rearrangement?
a) a
b) b
c) c
d) d
e) e

Q15. Which is the Fourth step after rearrangement?
a) a
b) b
c) c
d) d
e) e

Directions (16-17): In each of the following sentences, there is a blank space. Below each such sentence, there are four options with one word each. Fill up the blank with the word that makes the sentence grammatically and contextually correct.
Q16. Progress so far has been………….., largely because the process is costly.
a) boorish
b) blatant
c) bestowed
d) deny
e) tardy

Q17. The focus of global talks could shift from the moral ………….. to quit spewing pollutants towards crafting a deal between those doing the most damage.
a) explicit
b) sinuous
c) drift
d) imperative
e) rare

Directions (18-20): Answer the questions given below based on the passage.
Q18. According to passage what is the meaning of the phrase bear the brunt of?
a) Begin one’s journey
b) To enjoy oneself, have a good time
c) Try to take on a task too big for oneself
d) To suffer the worst part of an unpleasant or problematic situation.
e) The entire thing, all of something

Q19. According to passage what do you understand by”Cathedral thinking”?
a) a far-reaching vision
b) a well thought-out blueprint
c) a shared commitment to long-term implementation
d) Concentrate on minor issues
e) Only a, b & c

Q20. Which of the following statements is/are true in context of the passage above?
(I) Many analysts caution against the bandying about of doomsday scenarios
(II) The global average sea level is projected to rise by 1.1 metres by 2100
(III) Acc. to paris Accord to keep our average temperature from rising no further than 1.5° Celsius
a) Only (III)
b) Both (I) and (II)
c) Both (II) and (III)
d) All are correct
e) Only (II)

Answers With Explanation

 

Ans.1, d it means tower above and cast a shadow over. Or appear more prominent or important than.
Ans.2, c it means lacking foresight or intellectual insight.
Ans.3, a it means a confident and forceful statement of fact or belief.
Ans.4, b Squabble means quarrel noisily over a trivial matter. Accord means give or grant someone (power, status, or recognition).
Ans.5, e Exasperation means a feeling of intense irritation or annoyance. Charm means please (someone) greatly.
Ans.6, d The use of ought to is similar to should, but it is much less frequent.
Like should, the verb ought to does not have a past form. It is only used with reference to the present and the future.
Ought to is rarely used in questions and negatives. When it is, it is confined mainly to formal styles.
In negatives, not comes between ought and to. In questions, the subject comes between ought and to.
I ought not to have said those things to her.
Ought to is used as follows:
to express an obligation or an expectation that someone should do something.
You ought to listen carefully.
to express the likelihood of something happening.
Annabel ought to be here by now.
Ans.7, a Some writers and editors add only an apostrophe to all nouns ending in s. And some add an apostrophe + s to every proper noun, be it Hastings’s or Jones’s.

One method, common in newspapers and magazines, is to add an apostrophe + s (‘s) to common nouns ending in s, but only a stand-alone apostrophe to proper nouns ending in s.
Examples:
the class’s hours
Mr. Jones’ golf clubs
Ans.8, a it means very large; huge.
Ans.9, d it means lasting or existing forever; without end.
Ans.10, b it means open to discussion or argument.
Ans.11, a use an in place of a because.
‘A’ and ‘an’ are both indefinite articles used before nouns or before adjectives that modify nouns. To determine if you should use ‘a’ or ‘an’ before a word, you need to listen to the sound the word begins with.
Use ‘a’ if the word begins with a consonant sound and use ‘an’ if the word begins with a vowel sound. Below are some examples.
a book
an apple
It is important that you listen to the sound, and not only look at the letter. For example, ‘unicorn’ begins with (the y sound) so you should use ‘a’ before it. The word ‘honor’ begins with /o/ so you should use ‘an’ before it. Below are some examples.
I drive a blue car
They have an old house.
Ans.12, e no error.
Ans.13, d is correct. Because the correct sequence is BDCEA.
Ans.14, c is correct.
Ans.15, e is correct.
Ans.16, e it means delaying or delayed beyond the right or expected time; late.
Ans.17, d it means of vital importance; crucial.
Ans.18, d according to passage d is correct.
Ans.19, e according to passage e is correct.
Ans.20, d according to passage d is correct.

 

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